The Music of Colonial Latin America Series: March 5-8

The Music of Colonial Latin America Series: March 5-8

 Thursday, March 5 at 7:30pm to 9:00pm

More dates through March 8, 2020

 WPAC – Wertheim Performing Arts Center, Concert Hall (Room 170) 
10910 SW 17th St., Miami, FL 33199

The music of Spanish Colonial Latin America is rich in flavor, history, and expression. This concert series explores music from Mexico City and New Spain, with a particular interest in the musical life of New Spanish cathedrals and music written by Italian composer, Ignacio Jerusalem, and his contemporaries.

Presented as part of the 2020 International Conference on Colonial Music: Music and Arts of Colonial Spain. Information at music.fiu.edu/colonialconference. 

ENTIRE SCHEDULE OF CONCERTS

March 5 | 7:30pm

Music of the Mexico’s Cathedral (1550-1750)

Join the FIU Collegium Musicum, under the direction of Juvenal Correa-Salas, for a not-to-be-missed performance tracing the history and musical development of New Spain’s most important religious center with works by Franco, Fernandez, Céspedes, Salazar, Padilla, Sumaya, and Jerusalem.

– Located at the Wertheim Concert Hall, FIU’s Modesto A. Maidique Campus

$15 General Admission, $10 FIU Faculty, Staff, Seniors, and Alumni, $5 Students (with valid i.d.) 

BUY TICKETS NOW

March 6 | 7:30pm

Baroque and Galant Music from the New Spanish Cathedrals

FIU Concert Choir

Maria Guinand, conductor

Juvenal Correa-Salas, organ and harpsichord

Works by Billoni (Durando), Salas (Santiago de Cuba), Manuel José de Quiróz (Guatemala), Sumaya (Mexico City), and Ignacio Jerusalem (Mexico City).

– Located at the Wertheim Concert Hall, FIU’s Modesto A. Maidique Campus

$15 General Admission, $10 FIU Faculty, Staff, Seniors, and Alumni, $5 Students (with valid i.d.)

BUY TICKETS NOW

March 7 | Pre-Concert Talk 7:10pm | 7:30pm Concert

Eighteenth-Century Music from the Mexico City Cathedral: Commemorating the 250th Anniversary of the Death of Ignacio Jerusalem (1707-1769)

Chicago Arts Orchestra (Professional Chamber Orchestra from Chicago)

Javier José Mendoza, Artistic Director

with Special Guests, Encantus Voices Choir

Maibel Troia, Conductor

Don’t miss this chance to hear the acclaimed Chicago Arts Orchestra present Spanish music from the colonial era, never before heard in Florida! Named a “Critic’s Pick” by Time Out Chicago and a “Recommend” by the Chicago Tribune, the CAO has garnered an international reputation for performing galant music from Spanish archives in the New World. The CAO’s 2012 album release Al combate and forthcoming release of Ignacio Jerusalem’s Mass in G are examples of the orchestras work and dedication to colonial Spanish Repertoire. Join us to hear these rarely performed treasures of Spanish Heritage. Tickets available at www.ChicagoArtsOrchestra.org

– Located at La Merced Chapel on the campus of Corpus Christi Church

$35 General Admission | $20 Seniors | $10 Students with ID

BUY TICKETS NOW

March 8 | Pre-Concert Talk 3:45pm | 4:00pm Concert

Eighteenth-Century Music from the Mexico City Cathedral: Commemorating the 250th Anniversary of the Death of Ignacio Jerusalem (1707-1769)

Chicago Arts Orchestra

Javier José Mendoza, Artistic Director

with Special Guests, Encantus Voices Choir

Maibel Troia, Conductor

Don’t miss this chance to hear the acclaimed Chicago Arts Orchestra present Spanish music from the colonial era, never before heard in Florida! Named a “Critic’s Pick” by Time Out Chicago and a “Recommend” by the Chicago Tribune, the CAO has garnered an international reputation for performing galant music from Spanish archives in the New World. The CAO’s 2012 album release Al combate and forthcoming release of Ignacio Jerusalem’s Mass in G are examples of the orchestras work and dedication to colonial Spanish Repertoire. Join us to hear these rarely performed treasures of Spanish Heritage. Tickets available at www.ChicagoArtsOrchestra.org

– Located at La Merced Chapel on the campus of Corpus Christi Church

$35 General Admission | $20 Seniors | $10 Students with ID

BUY TICKETS NOW

Venice Baroque Orchestra

On March 1, this prestigious ensemble will perform a selection of 18th century Baroque masterpieces, including famous concerti by Antonio Vivaldi and Francesco Geminiani’s version of the most popular tune in music history, La Folia – all with authentic period instruments and inimitable virtuosity.
 
The Venice Baroque Orchestra was founded in 1997 by Baroque scholar and harpsichordist, Andrea Marcon. Under his leadership, the orchestra has given modern-day premiers of rarely performed historical operas, including Francesco Cavalli’s L’Orione, Vivaldi’s AtenaideAndromeda liberata, Benedetto Marcello’s La morte d’Adone and Il trionfo della poesia e della musica, and Boccherini’s La Clementina.
 
The critically acclaimed ensemble has performed in more U.S. cities than any other Baroque orchestra in history, in addition to extensive tours across Asia and Europe. The orchestra has also thrilled audiences worldwide through several television specials, including films by the BBC, ARTE, NTR (Netherlands), and NHK.

This concert is a co-production presented by the FIU School of Music and RK Cultural Productions. 

David Dolata
Professor of Musicology
 
 

Marco Battaglia: 19th-century Guitar Art Music

Marco Battaglia will present The Guitar in Early 19th Century. He will discuss guitar family period instruments, sources, repertoire, and performance practices in the early 19th century. The main purpose of the lecture is to identify and use a method for analyzing the original sources (sheet music and editions) and coming up with a technique also based on research into literature on interpretation related to other instruments in addition to the guitar. Special attention is paid to period guitars, their history and development starting with the early 6-string ones with six simple strings up to those prior to the Torres version, to the design features and various types of materials used in making the strings.

David Dolata: Lutorama

David Dolata‘s lecture-demo Lutorama take you on a tour through his lutes where he explains the instrument’s evolution in response to the repertoire and the differences among them and plays some Renaissance and Baroque pieces on each of them. If you ask a lutenist’s wife how many lutes her husband needs, she’ll respond: “just one more.” Classical guitarists generally get by with just one guitar, so why can’t lutenists? In his presentation, David Dolata will answer that question by showing the audience his five lutes and counting and how they’re used. After that you’ll know why lutenists always need just one more.

Vivaldi’s Motezuma at FIU

Please join us for this rare opportunity to hear Vivaldi’s recently rediscovered opera Motezuma, which first premiered in Venice in 1733 and was loosely inspired by the historic 1519 encounters between Hernan Cortes, a Spanish conquistador, and Aztec ruler Montezuma. The performance of this semi-staged opera in collaboration with the Bach Society of Minnesota provides us with a glimpse of Vivaldi’s perspective on the settlement of the New World. This is the first of two Spring 2020 co-productions presented by the FIU School of Music and RK Cultural Productions. Mark your calendars for our second event, a performance by the celebrated Venice Baroque Orchestra on Sunday, March 1, 2020, at the Herbert and Nicole Wertheim Performing Arts Center Concert Hall.

FIU Collegium Musicum Concert

The Spring 2019 FIU Collegium Musicum concert is not to be missed. Our new Director Juvenal Correa-Salas has created a delightful extravaganza that tours the audience through music history exploring the intimate relationship among music, song, and dance with live dancers accompanied by harpsichord, organ, viola da gamba, vielle, violin, cello, recorders, sackbut, crumhorns, percussion, and lute and theorbo. Click here for more information or to order tickets.

See you there,

David Dolata
FIU Collegium Musicum Director Emeritus


Alison Crum and Roy Marks in Concert

Alison Crum is one of the best-known British exponents of the viol. As teacher, performer, and moving spirit behind several well-known early music groups, she has travelled all over the world giving recitals and lectures and teaching on summer schools and workshops. Alison is President of the Viola da Gamba Society of Great Britain, Professor of Viol at Trinity Laban Conservatoire in London, and a visiting teacher at several colleges and universities in both Europe and the USA. She is also the author of two highly acclaimed books on playing the viol, and has been called the doyenne of British viol teachers.